Tag Archive: paesaggio

  1. Tree Top Trail
    Lagodekhi | Georgia

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    Located amid Lagodekhi Natural Reserve in eastern Georgia, the Tree Top Trail is meant to maximize the experience of nature, intended as -in the words of David Attenborough, “the greatest source of excitement, beauty and intellectual interest”. The trail, takes advantage of the topography in order to avoid the use of an elevator. The access point is located on a higher point of the uneven terrain and, from there, it ramps up to reach greater heights, gradually showcasing the forest as a vertical ecosystem. 

    Its defining circular shape, sharply contrasts with the forms of nature, avoiding any simplistic mimic; furthermore, the trail trajectory is always curving, constantly disappearing within the forest canopy, generating a desire to discover the forest, step by step.
    Three main attractions are placed within the trail: a copper sphere which functions as a multimedia room for 360 degrees’ projections, a large net, for visitors to lay or play and a panoramic tower which allows a view over the forest, and integrates a half-spiral staircase to exit, as an alternative to walking back through the long ramp of the trail.

     

    The columns of the structure are organized in clusters, abstract simplifications representing group of trees in the forest and are made from cor-ten steel. In total there are 17 column clusters that support the trail and the additional elements.

     

     

  2. Revealing Geometries
    Kaliningrad | Russia

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    Kaliningrad is a city defined by a long and complex history: the palimpsest of the different trances of the past have been –for the most part- erased by the World War. Nevertheless, the project site is one of the few parts of the city that have survived, and is currently witness the different epochs that the city has gone through; the upper and lower pond of Teutonic’s Knights, the military defense infrastructures of the Prussians and the Soviet public park. Despite its cultural relevance, the park has been left abandoned for decades, and the historical infrastructures have turned into ruins. 

     

    “Revealing Geometries” takes shape physically and conceptually, from the fact that ruins can become –as a radical form of preservation- the matrix for a new identity, and similarly, untamed nature the matrix for a rich natural ecosystem. The recognition of the site as a form of archeological park – gives the opportunity to secure in time and space the traces of the past, transforming them into a new cultural/education infrastructure at public disposal. 

    While radical preservation defines the general approach, two design actions are re-defining the park(s): (1) retracing the former path system of the Prussian’s Wallpromeade and (2) defining new geometries that can enhance the rich cultural/environmental context of the area while hosting new programmatic opportunities. 

     

     

    The geometrical spatial definition of the “devices” -responding to the military defense infrastructure and Prussian landscape gardening design language- overlaps with the parks in seven different locations. They are as intensive design interventions centered around the main features of the site (water, ruins, topography, etc.); they are program-less objects that create the conditions for temporary occupation, while permanently highlighting the cultural and environmental diversity of the park, and more broadly, of the ring to-come.

     

    The park is in-fact a system of 2 parks defined by autonomous identities: Kashtanovy Park and Litovsky Park, tight together by a comprehensive strategy. It bears the potential of rethinking the former ring as a whole: a new infrastructure that can host social and ecological interaction, while bringing back the historical layers as evidences to pass-on to future generations. 

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  3. Into the Forest
    Mantova | Italy

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    Openfabric has been selected to design the public spaces of Mantova city center in occasion of the first World Forum on Urban Forest (WFUF 2018) by FAO. The aim of the design is to engage with the two different levels of the forum: the academic one and the broad public. The project wants to critically represent a number of forest typologies rising both awareness on the importance of nature in urban environments and on the dramatic effects of climate change. Through the tools of ambiguity, juxtaposition, aesthetics and discomfort, Into the Forest aims to challenge the perception of nature and aspires to be adopted by cities, globally.

     

    Fallen Forest

    “Fallen Forest” is a memorial for the millions of trees victims of the cyclone that hit the North-Eastern regions of Italy on November 2nd, 2018. The installation confronts the phenomena of climate tropicalisation and its catastrophic effects on the environment, by recreating a portion of post-apocalyptic landscape. Climate change is real, action is urgent.

     

     

     

    Mediterranean Forest

    The Mediterranean sclerophyllous evergreen oak forest shapes the character of Mediterranean landscapes with a wide variety of formations and structures, according to climate, soil, and anthropogenic conditions. The dominant tree species are Quercus ilex, Quercus rotundifolia, Quercus suber, Laurus nobilis and Arbutus unedo, the latter two having rather often a shrub growth form. The evergreen oak woodlands have been a strategic resource along the history of human societies in the region, providing direct and indirect goods and benefits, as fuelwood, cork, food and fodder, timber, shelter. They range from sea level up to 800-900 a.s.l. and the tree and shrub species are generally very well drought- and fire-adapted.

     

     

     

    Native Forest

    The “Native Forest” recalls a fragment of the ancient forest formations widely covering the Po Valley (Pianura Padana) before the massive transformation to agriculture and urban land cover. In fact large part of Northern Italy was very likely covered by lowlands forests dominated by Quercus spp. and Carpinus betulus, referring to Sub-Atlantic and medio-European oak or oak-hornbeam forests of the Carpinion betuli, as classified by the European manual of habitats. The forests currently survive only in few, small patches, protected as nature reserves. The lowlands forests, although almost disappeared, should be considered for their strategic environmental value, as an intangible heritage of natural and cultural capital of local communities.

     

     

  4. Parco Reggia di Rivalta
    Reggio Emilia | Italy

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    The “Parco della Reggia di Rivalta” although its empty appearance, is a ground that has been occupied by several functions over time: it has been administrated by several owners, and it has gone through both splendor and decay. In the public imaginary, the park is associated with the garden realized in the first half of the 18th century –now lost- where the reference to Versailles Garden was sharp and recognizable. Yet, the site has been witnessing a number of histories and not just one.
    The plurality of the past traces become main ingredients of the design, a palimpsest which doesn’t give priority only to the historical garden, but also refers to the different epochs, including its rural past and its current use as a public park.

     

    A perimetral boulevard hosts a number of ‘design intensities’ while assuring a complete accessibility of the site. The boulevard creates a frame that defines a inner rural park: agricultural land is here rendered accessible by diagonal paths, that refer to both the enlighten landscape design principles as much as to the agricultural pattern of the region.

     

     

    The park becomes a platform for several programmatic scenarios, from local ones to national or even international events. The park aims to bridge the gap between conservation and change, reinterpreting the traces of the past in a contemporary park able to respond to the local yet global identity of Reggio Emilia.

     

     

     

  5. Commission | Jul 2018
    Tree Top Trail
    Lagodekhi | Georgia

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    We have been selected to design a Tree Top Trail in Lagodekhi Natural Park in east Georgia, alongside Cityförster, Imagine Structure GmbH and the Caucasus Environmental NGO Network (CENN). The project, commissioned by WWF Caucasus Programme Office, is a pedestrian flyover meandering in between the high trees, and is intended as a new eco-touristic attraction able to address both educational and recreational elements. The infrastructure, once realized, will become a device to experience the diverse ecosystems of Lagodekhi Protected Areas.

  6. Emergent Farm
    Capitanata | Italy

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    “Caporalato” is a system of illegal recruitment of agricultural workers, diffuse in Italy and elsewhere. Although is relatively little known phenomenon, it is extensively diffuse and integral part of the food chain of several Italian products, some of which are considered excellence and exported all ‘over Europe.
    “Emergent Farm” proposal takes shape from the assumption that “Caporalato” is a form of slavery that should, with multilateral efforts, supplanted with legal forms of organization of agricultural labor. Although “Emergent Farm” can not intervene on the endemic causes of “Caporalato”, it can contribute to the formalization of seasonal settlements by proposing a new model of agricultural complex. Emergent Farm is a legal, flexible and integrated alternative to the current condition; its aim is to become a speculative tool, in contrast with the “diffuse-slum” condition.

    Caporalato is a illegal system of recruitment of agricultural workers; it’s extensively diffuse and integral part of the food chain of several Italian agro-produces, some of which are considered excellence and exported all ‘over Europe

     

    The different illegal settlements spread in the Italian countryside respond to three typologies: 1. the Slum (made of temporary shacks), 2. the pulviscular slum (occupation of old rural complexes), 3. The greenhouse system (where accommodation are embedded in the greenhouse areas)

     


    “Emergent Farm” proposal takes shape from the assumption that “Caporalato” is a form of slavery that should, with multilateral efforts, supplanted with legal forms of organization of agricultural labor. Although “Emergent Farm” can not intervene on the endemic causes of “Caporalato”, it can contribute to the formalization of seasonal settlements by proposing a new model of agricultural complex. Emergent Farm can become a legal, flexible and integrated alternative to the current condition; its aim is to become a speculative tool, in contrast with the “diffuse-slum” condition.


    A linear shed works as a shading element, collecting rainwater and producing solar energy. Temporary wooden modules can be built and dismantled according to seasonal needs and, a large central vegetable garden foster self-sustainability and creates the conditions for a new sense of rural community. This structure can be linked to traditional abandoned buildings that can become markets for locally harvested products.

     

    Emergent Farm is a flexible and integrated alternative to the current condition; its aim is to become a speculative tool, in contrast with the “diffuse-slum” condition.

     

     

  7. Gridgrounds
    Amsterdam | Netherlands

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    Het Breed is a modernist neighbourhood defined by rational residential blocks, 5 stories with ‘streets in the sky’ in Amsterdam North designed by the architect Frans Van Gool in 1963.
    Our proposal ‘Gridgrounds’ creates an elongated public square of 88m x 17m, stretched across the central space so all paths converge here defining a new center for the neighbourhood. The asphalt square is based upon the original neighbourhood grid and the grid is made visual and tangible through the white marking lines running through the space. At the points of the grid we placed different play elements in-spired by the modernist playgrounds of Aldo van Eyck in Amsterdam. To create coherence all objects are painted Breedveld orange and blue, two colours that have been used in a recent renovation of the adjacent buildings. Through the cohesion of the colour, each object achieves a new identity, independent works that collectively form an open-air museum of play elements.

    The austerity and monotony of the context is broken by the new playscape while employing the same ele-ments and the layout of the Van Gool plan.
    The square is framed by the grid of plane trees and grass and planting along the sides, the rectilinear form is punctured at three points by two green circles (active play space developed with local schools and pas-sive green space that acts as a sustainable drainage point) and a rectangular multifunctional sports court.
    Given the very limited budget we chose to focus on primarily creating a good functioning public space, a meeting point for all residents at the centre of the neighbourhood. The careful placement of the elements creates different gathering points for groups big or small. Our material palette takes inspiration from road infrastructure, considerably cheaper than usual open space design materials, asphalt surfaces, white road marking lines and “traffic orange” (Ral 2009) and “traffic blue” (Ral 5017) colours. Colourful landmarks make the space identifiable from a distance, an important factor in children’s spatial awareness.
    The low cost materials don’t compromise the quality of the space and the range of possible activities, but rather –here in Breedveld- create a solid and durable playscape that can be use in many unpredictable ways by the many visitors, with a relatively limited economical investment.

     

     

  8. Lec­ture | Oct 2016
    Aga TN
    Trento | Italy

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    buona_giovane_cover

    The Trentino young architects association (AgaTN) has invited Openfabric, alongside other young emerging practices, to showcase realised projects in the form of panels, in the streets of Trento.
    The three offices took part of a lecture series and roundtables to discuss the challenges of the practices in Italy and abroad, bringing examples of projects characterized by a successful process that lead to their realization.  

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