Tag Archive: planning

  1. Parco del Ponte
    Genova | Italy

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    The “Parco del Ponte” is not a single park: the park is made up of five distinct parks that alternate and intertwine, responding to the articulated complexity of Polcevera Valley. The project responds to the different -rather conflicting- identities of the valley, proactively avoiding any forced simplification which wouldn’t pay respect to the multiple souls of the site and the city. The community, the river, the industry, the railway and the hills are the elements that emerge as layers of a juxtapose palimpsest of a valley that has been and -must continue to be- one of the main driving forces of a city that seeks re-birth.

     

    The “Parco del Ponte” is a large-scale urban strategy that proposes to intervene in the urban fabric with micro-interventions in order to generate a new urban structure centered around public space and ecology.
    A thoughtful approach that addresses a bottom-up multi-folded strategy which complements the necessary top down approach of the infrastructural reality of the valley.

     

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    The project responds to the different -rather conflicting- identities of the valley, proactively avoiding any forced simplification which wouldn’t pay respect to the multiple souls of the site and the city

     

    The project doesn’t challenge nor mimic the large-scale infrastructure of the new bridge but -rather, it looks downwards at the intimate human scale of the district life

    The “Parco del Ponte” are an opportunity to consolidate a fragile territory by stabilizing hilly slopes, reducing river flood hazard and reclaiming a soil that has been polluted by the presence of over a century of massive industrial production.

     

     

    The “Parco del Ponte” has the potential to revive the industrial identity by directing it towards small and medium-sized high-tech companies and thus catalyze the many research realities present in the territory.

  2. Tree Top Trail
    Lagodekhi | Georgia

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    Located amid Lagodekhi Natural Reserve in eastern Georgia, the Tree Top Trail is meant to maximize the experience of nature, intended as -in the words of David Attenborough, “the greatest source of excitement, beauty and intellectual interest”. The trail, takes advantage of the topography in order to avoid the use of an elevator. The access point is located on a higher point of the uneven terrain and, from there, it ramps up to reach greater heights, gradually showcasing the forest as a vertical ecosystem. 

    Its defining circular shape, sharply contrasts with the forms of nature, avoiding any simplistic mimic; furthermore, the trail trajectory is always curving, constantly disappearing within the forest canopy, generating a desire to discover the forest, step by step.
    Three main attractions are placed within the trail: a copper sphere which functions as a multimedia room for 360 degrees’ projections, a large net, for visitors to lay or play and a panoramic tower which allows a view over the forest, and integrates a half-spiral staircase to exit, as an alternative to walking back through the long ramp of the trail.

     

    The columns of the structure are organized in clusters, abstract simplifications representing group of trees in the forest and are made from cor-ten steel. In total there are 17 column clusters that support the trail and the additional elements.

     

     

  3. Commission | Jul 2018
    Tree Top Trail
    Lagodekhi | Georgia

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    We have been selected to design a Tree Top Trail in Lagodekhi Natural Park in east Georgia, alongside Cityförster, Imagine Structure GmbH and the Caucasus Environmental NGO Network (CENN). The project, commissioned by WWF Caucasus Programme Office, is a pedestrian flyover meandering in between the high trees, and is intended as a new eco-touristic attraction able to address both educational and recreational elements. The infrastructure, once realized, will become a device to experience the diverse ecosystems of Lagodekhi Protected Areas.

  4. Commission | Jul 2018
    World Forum on Urban Forests
    Mantua | Italy

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    We have been selected to design the public spaces of city center Mantova (Italy) in the occasion of the “First World Forum on Urban Forests 2018”. The Forum is promoted by FAO and organized with the support of Comune di Mantova, Politecnico di Milano and Sisef, and will be held from November 28th to December 1st 2018. The goal of the event is to bring together a great number of international experts from different disciplines and backgrounds to discuss how to make cities greener, healthier and happier places.

  5. Altitudes
    Selva Central | Peru

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    “Altitudes” is a rural strategy for the Selva Central region in Peru. The region is in a unique geographical condition, being simultaneously part of the Andes mountain range and also the Amazon river basin. The region is defined by the extensive production of coffee, around which the local economy is completely reliant. The urge for a spatial vision is enhanced by the changing climate: because of rising temperatures the agricultural landscape is a ‘migrating’ one. In-fact, producers are moving the coffee plantations uphill, whilst – in lower altitudes – former productive areas are rendered vacant and available for future scenarios. As coffee production is defined by specific geographical and environmental conditions, the study goes beyond the given site-boundaries and elaborates on a global condition: the condition of resource extraction.

     

    The aim of ‘Altitudes’ is to reorganise a currently inefficient coffee production chain, demonstrating the touristic potential of the area, whilst creating the conditions for the region to move beyond the monoculture of coffee and its fragile single-commodity economy. The economy of coffee is extremely volatile – a condition evident in the annual glaring discontinuity of supply and demand – and this imbalance is heightened by the patterns of the changing climate.

     

     

    The study aims to create the conditions for the region to move beyond the monoculture of coffee and its fragile single-commodity economy

     

    The condition for a mix-polyculture can be created through enhancing the vertical economy of the “Selva”. Whilst the coffee shrubs are maintained as an undergrowth layer, new species can be introduced in order to increase the agro-diversity and expand agricultural export opportunities.

     

    The coffee production chain and touristic accessibility is unfolded and re-organised. A new hierarchy is given to the distribution and processing infrastructure which is now defined in 3 steps: the producers, coffee collection facilities and the cooperatives. Furthermore, circularities are highlighted such as the production of energy from solid waste, new marketable by-products and compost to feed back to producers.

     

     

     

     

  6. Zhangjiang Future Park
    Shanghai | China

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    Zhangjiang Future Park will become a new focal point for Pudong with communal public facilities combining nature, culture and entertainment with green landscaped buildings and a public park blending into its surrounding.
    Located in Pudong, Shanghai, Zhangjiang Future Park is part of a high-technology and innovation district for both national and international companies hosting over 100,000 workers. Aside from being a business and industrial park, the area provides residences for workers and their families who live nearby. The competition-winning design combines 10,000m2 of public plazas and 37,000m2 of four distinct venues – a library, an art centre, a performance centre and a sports centre. Furthermore, 56,000m2 of public park will be created which blends in and draws from the natural green surrounding landscapes.

     

     

    The four distinct buildings are at the heart of this development and offer within walking distance an array of cultural and entertainment facilities. They all have activated roofs forming an elevated area connected together with pedestrianized bridges, acting as a second city layer that provides views of the river and neighborhood and picnic areas. The design proposes a recognizable collection of buildings that emerge seemingly like silhouetted cracks in the landscape and provide different perspectives depending on where one is located on the site. The green roofs program not only offers a lively and biodiverse park program integrated into the building’s function but they provide sustainable benefits including stormwater drainage, cleaner air, noise reduction and energy savings due to thermal insulation.