Tag Archive: strategy

  1. Altitudes
    Selva Central | Peru

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    “Altitudes” is a rural strategy for the Selva Central region in Peru. The region is in a unique geographical condition, being simultaneously part of the Andes mountain range and also the Amazon river basin. The region is defined by the extensive production of coffee, around which the local economy is completely reliant. The urge for a spatial vision is enhanced by the changing climate: because of rising temperatures the agricultural landscape is a ‘migrating’ one. In-fact, producers are moving the coffee plantations uphill, whilst – in lower altitudes – former productive areas are rendered vacant and available for future scenarios. As coffee production is defined by specific geographical and environmental conditions, the study goes beyond the given site-boundaries and elaborates on a global condition: the condition of resource extraction.

     

    The aim of ‘Altitudes’ is to reorganise a currently inefficient coffee production chain, demonstrating the touristic potential of the area, whilst creating the conditions for the region to move beyond the monoculture of coffee and its fragile single-commodity economy. The economy of coffee is extremely volatile – a condition evident in the annual glaring discontinuity of supply and demand – and this imbalance is heightened by the patterns of the changing climate.

     

     

    The study aims to create the conditions for the region to move beyond the monoculture of coffee and its fragile single-commodity economy

     

    The condition for a mix-polyculture can be created through enhancing the vertical economy of the “Selva”. Whilst the coffee shrubs are maintained as an undergrowth layer, new species can be introduced in order to increase the agro-diversity and expand agricultural export opportunities.

     

    The coffee production chain and touristic accessibility is unfolded and re-organised. A new hierarchy is given to the distribution and processing infrastructure which is now defined in 3 steps: the producers, coffee collection facilities and the cooperatives. Furthermore, circularities are highlighted such as the production of energy from solid waste, new marketable by-products and compost to feed back to producers.

     

     

     

     

  2. Archipelago of Knowledge
    Rotterdam | Netherlands

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    The Archipelago of Knowledge is a new spatial strategy for the city of Rotterdam, Netherlands, that reconsiders the relationship between port and city. Through the fragmentation of areas within the port, a series of islands are created, subsequently enabling the formation of a continuous, 100% accessible waterfront. Urban and ecological quality embedded in the direct relationship between city and water is re-established and enhanced, benefitting both citizens and the maritime cluster.

    The new linear waterfront finally brings water back to the city – a city that often lacks a direct relationship with its largest water body, the Maas River, despite its close proximity and historical and cultural significance. The new system goes beyond administrative boundaries and fragmentation, unifying ongoing efforts of port revitalization and creating one coherent urban vision. The strategy itself, before its implementation, can be seen as a tool to bring together a diverse group of actors; from the city, the maritime cluster, the port, and local communities. Additionally, the waterfront can become a shared space for negotiation where the interests and needs of various stakeholders are discussed in order to find points of intersection and mutual interest.

    The new islands are spatially defined areas where economic and planning scenarios unfold through time. Although their shape is fixed, their program, be it maritime, commercial, residential or recreational, can freely occupy the space according to future economic trends, needs, and decisions, ensuring a new beneficial relationship between port and city.

     

    The port areas are fragmented into islands, resulting in the formation of a continuous, 100% accessible, waterfront

    The waterfront is a system that goes beyond administrative borders and fragmentation but rather unifies the ongoing efforts of port revitalization into one, coherent urban vision

     

     

     

     

    Port expansion has always implied dramatic transformations of the river landscape. The port has expanded and transformed through time, occupying more and more surface. The time has come, now, with changing conditions of the port economy, to re-orient land transformations to the advantage of the city and its people.