Tag Archive: vision

  1. Genova Green Strategy
    Genova | Italy

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    Genova Green Strategy is a strategy aimed at increasing public green spaces and restructuring public spaces in Genova. The document establishes a series of objectives aimed at increasing soil permeability, mitigating environmental risks and redefining the relationship between city and nature.
    The strategy proposes a new interpretation of the city and defines guidelines and pilot projects for the design of open spaces in the short, medium and long term.
    A large urban forestry project where thousands of new trees and green spaces are organised according to qualitative and quantitative criteria.
    The ambition is to provide the city with a strategic document capable of transforming Genova into an international reference in redefining the relationship between nature and city, an example to follow in terms of mitigating hydrogeological risks and adapting to climate change.

    Multiple urban morphologies coexist in Genova; not only the various local identities of its neighbourhoods, but distinct and autonomous morphologies alternate, narrating the encounter -sometimes conflictual- between the natural territory and the built city.
    Genova is interpreted as a complex puzzle where 6 cities alternate: the “plain city”, the “uphill city”, the “archipelago city”, the “garden city”, the “agricultural city”, the “compact city”.

    Genova Green Strategy defines the guidelines that enable to act on all the districts of the city. The neighbourhoods themselves become a permeable, porous and performative green infrastructure, capable of functioning as a diffuse and capillary ecological network

    Genova Green Strategy defines a system of priorities that includes ongoing development and regeneration projects and, at the same time, identifies a series of new possible interventions.


    The coastal system, the valleys system and two large “parks” are identified: the “Grande Parco Ponente” with a technological vocation, and the “Grande Parco Levante” with an agricultural and cultural one. The strategy also identifies a number of “gates”, linking spaces of various natures that connect the city with the hinterland. All together these systems reorient the traditional perception of Genova as mere seaside city, towards an articulated and complex urban reality, which has in its diversity of landscapes its essential identity.

     

     

  2. Marconiplein
    Rotterdam | Netherlands

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    Traditionally, transport and public spaces are seen as conflicting systems, notion that has led to strategies oriented in separating mobility flows.
    But conditions are changing. The enhancement of slow mobility, the reduction of vehicular traffic, the technological improvements are leading to a sharp decrease of disturbance from transport sources. New scenarios are possible where vehicular transport and pedestrian areas can be integrated in new qualitative hybrid public spaces.

    Marconiplein is a Mixed-city hub typology: it is not located in the city center nor in the suburbs and can function as connection between the two. Such specific condition can play the role of connecting the adjacent districts together reinforcing the relevance of Marconiplein as a pivotal point, a new center, of the west.

     


    Currently Marconiplein is a large void in contrast with the adjacent districts charachertized by strong identities. The square is a transport-dominated space, defined by large number of mobility infrastructures, intersecting at different levels.
    Above all, Marconiplein is a dike, defending the city -below sea level- from the river fluctuations. Yet, the changing climate, poses a new challenge, as models indicate that the dike height may result insufficient, in the coming decades.

    The proposed vision aims to capitalise the strong and dynamic identities concentrated in the west of Rotterdam, changing the paradigm of Marconplein as a barrier. The need of re-thinbking the dike, is reflected in a new complex infrastructure, where the different neighbourhoods interface with the square in multiple ways. The hidden tridimensional nature of the square is unveiled and transformed into an articulated system of public spaces.

     

     

  3. Altitudes
    Selva Central | Peru

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    “Altitudes” is a rural strategy for the Selva Central region in Peru. The region is in a unique geographical condition, being simultaneously part of the Andes mountain range and also the Amazon river basin. The region is defined by the extensive production of coffee, around which the local economy is completely reliant. The urge for a spatial vision is enhanced by the changing climate: because of rising temperatures the agricultural landscape is a ‘migrating’ one. In-fact, producers are moving the coffee plantations uphill, whilst – in lower altitudes – former productive areas are rendered vacant and available for future scenarios. As coffee production is defined by specific geographical and environmental conditions, the study goes beyond the given site-boundaries and elaborates on a global condition: the condition of resource extraction.

     

    The aim of ‘Altitudes’ is to reorganise a currently inefficient coffee production chain, demonstrating the touristic potential of the area, whilst creating the conditions for the region to move beyond the monoculture of coffee and its fragile single-commodity economy. The economy of coffee is extremely volatile – a condition evident in the annual glaring discontinuity of supply and demand – and this imbalance is heightened by the patterns of the changing climate.

     

     

    The study aims to create the conditions for the region to move beyond the monoculture of coffee and its fragile single-commodity economy

     

    The condition for a mix-polyculture can be created through enhancing the vertical economy of the “Selva”. Whilst the coffee shrubs are maintained as an undergrowth layer, new species can be introduced in order to increase the agro-diversity and expand agricultural export opportunities.

     

    The coffee production chain and touristic accessibility is unfolded and re-organised. A new hierarchy is given to the distribution and processing infrastructure which is now defined in 3 steps: the producers, coffee collection facilities and the cooperatives. Furthermore, circularities are highlighted such as the production of energy from solid waste, new marketable by-products and compost to feed back to producers.